Herb Spotlight: Hibiscus

Herb Spotlight

Hibiscus creates the most perfect tart flavoring for iced teas and even sorbets, and it also does some other wonderful things aside from tickle the senses. The flower, root and seed can all be used in decoctions, tinctures and even cleansers for your skin. The Hibiscus flower comes in thousands of species that thrive in warm or warm-temperate climates. It is often found in Asian countries.

Breakdown of Hibiscus 

Scientific Name: Hibiscus rosa-sinensis ; Hibisceaetribe of the family Malvaceae [aka: rose mallow shoeblackplant, Chinese hibiscus, China rose, Hawaiian hibiscus]

Parts Used: flower, stem and sap

Magical Stats: Water Element, Ruled by Venus

Improves Function of the:

  • bowels
  • cardiovascular system
  • intestines
  • antioxidants

Aides in relieving symptoms of:

  • high cholesterol
  • uterine cramps
  • high blood pressure
  • menopause
  • diabetes

Assists spiritually with:

  • Connecting to the divine feminine
  • Worshipping Kali or Devi
  • Petition for mercy
  • Add beauty to and uplift your life

How Does It Work?

Hibiscus is believed to be an astringent. Mucilage found in the roots soothe the mucous membranes that line our respiratory and digestive tracts.  Anthocyanocides are astringent and anti-inflammatory. Lastly, I-hydroxy-acids work on the horny layer of the skin when applied topically, creating a more cohesive layer which results in  more elastic and moisturized skin and richer hair.

What Do I Do With It?

Hibiscus Flower

A decoction can be created from the flower of the rosa-sinensis. Hibiscus has a tart, delicious taste that is truly unique to it; home brewed tea is delicious when cold or hot. The tea will help to regulate blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugars. The tea holds a large quantity of antioxidants and can help regulate your system. With regulated blood pressure you may experience a balanced body temperature. You can experience help with muscle spasm and relieve other pain as well. Tea will also function as a mild laxative and diuretic.

Hibiscus flower is also used topically to shine shoes. It’s anti-inflammatory properties make it a great addition to skin care issues, helping acne and other skin problems. It is also used in shampoo to fortify locks and make them more thick, and lustrous. Boil the flower in oil with other chosen spices to make a medicated hair oil. Or grind the flowers and leaves in the fine paste with some water until it is a lathery paste. That will create a shampoo plus conditioner.

Hibiscus Roots

In Ayurvedic medicine the root of the Hibiscus plant can be used to stop hair loss, dandruff or greying. Ayurveda even recommends it to cure coughs. Creating a tincture out of the roots can help to spark up your digestive and respiratory tracts.

Hibiscus Seeds

Ancient Asian medicine recommends using the seeds of the flower to curb menstrual cramps and spasms. Create a decoction from the seed and drink it.

Hibiscus in Magic

The flower is used in incense to add beauty ultimately helping the practitioner by uplifting them. The flower is also used to petition for mercy. Essential oil is perfect for infusions that will connect you to the divine feminine. It is sacred to the goddess Kali in all of her guises.

WARNING: As always, if you are currently under the care of a doctor do not follow these instructions without consulting your physician.

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How To: Make Rose Water

Beauty Recipes, how to

Rose water has been used for years in alcoholic beverages, savory and sweet recipes, facial astringents and skin care regimens. I made mine to make a rose water facial astringent. It is so simple to make your own, and worth it just for the artisanal effect.

wp_20150518_19_58_45_proMeasure your rose petals 1:2 with water. I just fill my mason jar half way full with dried petals. Boil some water, once boiling pour over petals and let cool slightly with out lid on. Mix the petals together as the concoction cools. Once full steam ahead is through put a lid on your jar and throw it in the fridge. I like to label mine with the date, this is a good point to do so.

After 24 hours it is time to strain out your rose water. Put a strainer over a large bowl and pour the mixture through it. Push into the herbs with a spoon to get all the juice out. Pour your water back into the mason jar and store in the fridge for up to a month.